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Master of Science in

Information Technology Management

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Technology leaders are transforming the way businesses operate

Skills gap a problem - 70% of companies say there aren’t enough qualified IT professionals in the resume pool today - From CIOinsight.com

Smart businesses are leveraging the three primary areas of Information Technology – network, functional and enterprise – to not only support their business objectives, but also advance them. Successful businesses, governmental organizations and enterprises recognize IT as a strategic business motivator rather than simply as a cost center, and invest in their IT operations – and technical personnel – in order to deliver business value and stay nimble in the face of rapidly changing business conditions.

Today’s most valuable IT leaders are equipped to recognize, develop, implement and support technological opportunities to provide their organizations with necessary competitive advantage in the marketplace.

The Master’s Program

Where leaders, technology and business come together

Every successful organization needs both business managers and Information Technology professionals who understand leadership, strategy and technology – because without any one of these, growth is impossible. One of the most valuable members of any organization is the technology professional who understands business objectives – and how to best leverage the available technology and resources to define and meet those objectives.

The Information Technology Management program in the Division of Graduate Professional Studies offers both technological and managerial courses in order to develop leaders who can plan, organize and support solutions in a high-technology environment. The technical portion of the degree covers areas like operational strategy and infrastructure, while the management portion of the degree covers topics such as the leadership of virtual and global teams and CIO-level skills and functions. MS-ITM graduates understand how information systems are designed to support business models, and how information technology is used to automate and enhance business processes.

Program Outcomes

Graduates with a Master of Science in Information Technology Management are prepared to:

  • Develop and lead teams of technical people toward the achievement of established goals, and manage the development of their product.
  • Identify ways in which technology can be applied to solve existing, new or anticipated problems.
  • Leverage technology to realize strategic management goals and opportunities.
  • Assure the quality of information as well as its value to those who will ultimately use it for decision-making.
  • Think, write and speak cogently and persuasively about ongoing or anticipated work with colleagues, end-users and corporate leadership, and listen carefully to feedback.

Information Technology Management Degree Tracks

Students seeking a professional focus in the Master of Science in Information Technology Management program may choose to follow a specific set of courses referred to as a “track,” that focuses on a particular area of interest. These tracks are informal and intended to help students customize their education by selecting specific core and elective courses which closely align with their professional goals.

There are 4 IT Management Degree Tracks:

  1. Managing Health Information
  2. Securing IT Assets
  3. Enterprise Technology Management
  4. Software Design and Development

Ten courses are needed to receive a Master of Science in Information Technology Management degree, including four electives. In choosing electives, students can follow one of the suggested tracks, or personalize their degree by choosing any four courses offered online by Graduate Professional Studies. Students should work closely with their designated student advisor to outline course sequence and scheduling.

The required core courses are:

This course prepares professionals with communication skills necessary for success in their fields. The course addresses interpersonal, small group and public communication, and involves extensive practice writing and speaking on a variety of informative and persuasive topics.

At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Develop verbal and nonverbal communication styles by applying verbal and nonverbal skills in various speaking situations; videotaping and viewing one’s performance; critiquing one’s style; and receiving diagnostic evaluations.
  • Use techniques, such as cognitive restructuring, to reduce speaker apprehension.
  • Increase effectiveness in informative and persuasive message development using audience analysis, principles of organization, principles of Aristotle’s rhetoric, language devices, and supporting material (examples, narratives, testimony, and facts and statistics).
  • Write with clarity, brevity and vigor.
  • Strengthen self-awareness, assertiveness skills and listening skills to improve interpersonal, small group and public communication.
  • Analyze best practices for running an effective meeting.
  • Critically evaluate messages in terms of various criteria for effectiveness.

Course Requirements:

Blackboard Collaborate software will be provided to all students at no cost, for use in group work and recording of speech assignments.

WebCam and microphone are required for this course. Using the WebCam and microphone installed on your computer is acceptable. They are also available at major retail outlets, in the $20-$30 range.

This course examines strategic operational issues from the perspective of the CIO or IT Director, exploring how IT organizations can best be managed. The course explores best practices for deploying limited financial and human resources for optimal results.

At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Assess the importance of planning in IT organizations and contrast it to other types of business planning.
  • Discuss the strategic value of a technology roadmap.
  • Discuss key issues in IT budgeting.
  • Identify the level of maturity of a particular IT organization, and explain the factors that contribute to a more mature IT organization.
  • Identify the key operational issues and core capabilities required to deliver IT services, as well as the role of standards to assess in delivering and measuring the quality of IT services.
  • Identify the different options in sourcing, along with their advantages, disadvantages and potential concerns.
  • Assess ways of effectively managing IT’s information management and information delivery responsibilities.
  • Discuss the impact of government regulation on IT, and assess major regulations and their significance; assess ways that IT can support an effective policy and regulatory compliance program.
  • Evaluate the role and functions of the CIO, and assess attributes of a successful CIO.
  • Identify the major factors in IT planning and implementation in a global organization.

This course looks at strategic issues for the IT organization within the context of the larger organization and the relationship between the two. This course is designed to help today’s and tomorrow’s IT Directors/CIOs effectively exploit information systems technologies within the context of a company’s business needs.

At the end of this course the student will be able to:

  • Analyze the use of IT as a strategic tool for the business.
  • Be conversant with the business value of IT (ROI) and related risk(s).
  • Develop an IT Organizational Strategy.
  • Lead and manage the appropriate organizational behavior.
  • Lead and manage change within the IT organization.
  • Develop and use IT in supporting business alignment.
  • Analyze the role of the CIO within the business.
  • Organize an appropriate IT governance structure.
  • Develop an innovation strategy for the IT organization.

This course provides an opportunity for students to focus on leadership and the applicable skills needed to function as a leader in an organizational setting. The course looks at leadership as a process by which one person influences the attitudes and behaviors of others. It looks at leadership of organizations and groups, including teams. Concepts covered include various leadership theories and models, leadership across cultures, leadership ethics and attributes, organizational change/development, and, the role of the leader in establishing organizational culture and facilitating change. The course encourages self-assessment through group projects and leadership simulations.

At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the nature of leadership and assess the basic functions of management and the complexities of leadership.
  • Analyze the role of ethics and its role in organizational and team decisions.
  • Examine multiple viewpoints for differing frames of reference, perspectives, and orientations to the same situation.
  • Employ leadership, team-building and decision-making concepts; examine how teams make high-stakes decisions in stressful situation, why individuals and teams make flawed choices and how leaders shape the context and the process through which teams make decisions.
  • Critically reflect on leadership style and your own experience within a team and its leadership.
  • Understand the role of leaders in setting strategic focus and direction.

This course explores techniques for building, leading, managing, and motivating teams that reside in multiple locations. The course addresses methods to overcome the challenges of leading a virtual team with members in various geographical locations, including satellite and global offices and telecommuters. Concepts covered include virtual team structure; effective multi-cultural communication; motivation and performance considerations; knowledge sharing and knowledge management in a virtual, distributed team.

At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Lead teams in distributed work settings.
  • Demonstrate the people skills required to manage from a distance.
  • Build virtual teams, and apply strategies for managing multiple locations.
  • Understand and apply the group dynamics and social processes involved in leading teams at a distance.
  • Apply effective communication and structure for virtual teams.
  • Manage performance and motivation for virtual and global teams.
  • Enable knowledge sharing and management through team sharing approach and knowledge management tools.

Choose one of the courses listed below:

This course serves as an introductory course in the IT Management curriculum, spanning the wide range of technologies in use in modern organizations. The course covers the major issues involved in selecting and deploying particular technologies based on the requirements of a particular project. The course provides a foundation for future study in strategic deployment of information technology in support of the business.

At the end of this course the student will be able to:

  • Explain the historical context for studying information technology.
  • Differentiate between different kinds of computer hardware and software, and assess the varying options for deploying software such as virtualization and Software as a Service.
  • Describe the fundamental issues in telecommunications and networking and basic networking terminology.
  • Recognize why the database, and more specifically, data, is critical to the business and to IT.
  • Identify the strengths and weaknesses of enterprise systems (ERP), and its core underpinnings, the relational database.
  • Differentiate between data warehouses and transactional databases, and identify the strengths and weaknesses of each.
  • Identify and analyze the core issues involved in deploying and maintaining E-commerce and Business-to-business (B2B) systems.
  • Describe standard systems analysis and custom software development processes, and reasons for selecting an appropriate process.
  • Identify and analyze the issues in making the build versus buy decisions, and, when buying, the issues involved in managing the vendor.
  • Assess the major issues involved in providing user support in a large organization, and explain how standards such as ITIL and CoBIT assist in this endeavor.
  • Differentiate between IT security and information security, and recognize the major issues in ensuring both types security.
  • Describe how legal compliance affects IT decisions, and discuss the potential impact of these compliance issues on the business.

This course covers the history, current practice, and future directions of project management. Principles and concepts of project management are presented and discussed within the context of the knowledge areas and process groups defined in A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Guide). Concepts covered include process groups from initiation through closure; techniques for planning, estimating and reporting; management of risk, quality, resources, and communications; earned value analysis; agile and traditional methods of project management.

At the end of this course the student will be able to:

  • Write a clear, concise project charter document to launch a project.
  • Create a complete work breakdown structure to organize, define, and graphically display the work to be accomplished to achieve the objectives of a project.
  • Build a comprehensive project schedule using Microsoft Project to realize defined requirements given time and cost constraints.
  • Create, analyze, and respond to project tracking/control reports in the areas of requirements, staffing, incidents/quality, schedule, milestones, earned value, and risk.
  • Analyze change, configuration, and quality management processes in the context of managing a project.
  • Apply appropriate project management techniques based upon: the size and scope of the project; organizational structure, maturity, and culture; and procurement needs.

Microsoft Project (version 2002 or higher) is required for this course. A free 60-day trial version of Microsoft Project 2010 can be downloaded from www.microsoft.com. The software may be purchased for a substantially reduced price through www.journeyed.com with proof of academic status. Registered students can download an enrollment verification report from SAGE for this purpose. Contact gps@brandeis.edu if you need assistance.

*With permission, RVTM-120 Organizational Systems and Communications may be taken instead of RVTM-110

The four tracks that follow involve selections of electives in different focus areas.

  1. MANAGING HEALTH INFORMATION

    This track is designed to educate health care and management professionals with knowledge and expertise that is essential to the delivery of high-quality, cost-effective health services, and critical in the design, analysis and evaluation of health care information systems. This track offers those transitioning into the field an opportunity to build solid foundational knowledge.

    Some of the potential positions available with this track include health information management department director, health information systems manager, chief privacy officer, healthcare data analyst, health information application developer, information technologist. Potential workplaces include: HMO administrative office, health care clinic, hospital, insurance provider, hospitals, software and IT vendor firms, consulting firms and government agencies.

The following courses are recommended for this area (select four):

This course serves as an introductory course in the Health and Medical Informatics curriculum. The focus is on Health and Medical Informatics as a discipline and includes the coverage of major health care policies and standards that affect the health information industry, patient care systems (computerized patient records, delivery and monitoring systems), and modeling concepts and applications. Students will explore the impact of Information Technology on health care and analyze real applications of Health Informatics. Other topics include: healthcare system reform/accountable care, mobile health devices, telehealth and HIEs. This course also provides the opportunity for students to explore their own interests in sub-specialties of Health Informatics through a research project that will be shared and reviewed by other students in the class at the end of the semester.

At the end of this course students will be able to:

  • Understand the fundamentals of health care systems including providers, payments, and spending.
  • Be able to assess the impact of technology on health care and the role of health informatics in improving patient care, administration, and education.
  • Describe computerized patient records, interoperability, and adoption issues
  • Identify the principles of health information technology including IT infrastructure.
  • Discuss risks and privacy issues in introduction to health information security.
  • Analyze various types of health information including data, vocabularies, and standards.
  • Apply the use of clinical information systems and decision support systems to improve health care.
  • Describe implementations of actual health informatics technologies.

This course is designed to provide current and aspiring health/medical IT professionals with an understanding of the challenges of collecting and maintaining electronic health data. The course focuses on issues specific to health data and the systems implemented to collect and store it. This includes an overview of various types of hospital systems; methods used to interface between systems; and operations issues typical of hospital systems. The course also includes a study of controlled medical vocabularies typically used to define various types of health data as well as a survey of existing and evolving government driven standards and regulations.

At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Create a list of data elements that are desirable for inclusion in an electronic health record.
  • Diagram the data flow in existing healthcare environments.
  • Identify the most appropriate interface methods between both internal and external health information systems.
  • Develop an understanding of current standard in health and medical informatics.
  • Identify key technical considerations and hurdles in the implementation of an HER
  • Evaluate current and proposed regulations impacting electronic health data.
  • Distinguish when it is appropriate to utilize a controlled medical vocabulary (CMV) and which CMV is appropriate for a given situation.

This course addresses security, privacy, and compliance issues as they impact health information systems. The course explores and evaluates the moral and ethical concepts of information security. Students will explore security issues including restricted access and physical security of hardware/software along with the evaluation of information security tools. The course covers health data integrity, risks, and audit ability techniques along with regulatory compliance, confidentiality and privacy of patient data. The overall goal of the course is the evaluation and implementation of security in health information systems.

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • Recognize the role of information security, key concepts and the functions it plays on the business, organizational structure, healthcare industry and everyone involved in health care.
  • Understand the healthcare industry’s key concepts, security standards, healthcare applications and systems.
  • Recognize the need and ongoing maintenance of the information security program and how the information security function is positioned within organizations.
  • Identify the technical, organizational and human factors associated with information security.
  • Evaluate information security tools and perform regular audits to protect against threats facing healthcare organizations.
  • Differentiate between regulations, laws and ethics and understand the role of culture as it applies in information security and healthcare.
  • Assess risks to the security of data in a healthcare organization to minimize information security risks in the organization.
  • Understand how incident response planning, disaster recovery planning and business continuity are related to business contingency planning.
  • Oversee the systems development lifecycle (SDLC) for secure application systems design.

This course is designed to familiarize students with the different types of healthcare data, assure the quality of the data and how to understand and communicate the information provided in support of effective decision making by the various stakeholders of the healthcare system. Study and discussion topics will include how to choose the correct information for different decisions and communicate its meaning to users. Students will evaluate statistical methods and tools. The difference between research databases and operational databases will be covered along with techniques to effectively communicate quantitative healthcare data using tables and graphs. Methods for choosing the right medium will be explored in depth.

At the end of this course students will be able to:

  • Identify different types of administrative and clinical data and their uses in decision support.
  • Analyze various decision theories.
  • Evaluate various research models.
  • Describe the elements of high quality reliable data.
  • Identify and use various statistical methods and tools for the analysis of data.
  • Evaluate ways to report and graphically display data.

This course will offer students an opportunity to understand an historical perspective of Health Law, including how to assess liability in the workplace, the impact of information management and health care records, medical malpractice, risk management, current ethical and legal dilemmas in the practice of health care. This course focuses on some of the legal issues encountered in creating electronic interfaces between patients and the health care system in a variety of ways in which health care data is being utilized to support and enhance patient care, including documenting medical encounters, and serving as a benchmark of provider quality. Topics covered will include statutory and case law applicable to medical records and the developing regulatory infrastructure for such records. We will discuss the importance of use of electronic data in medical practice, institutional healthcare information systems, the inter-institutional record systems, and the risks, benefits and challenges, including how to manage risk of the employer and patient through the use of health information management medical records and how to determine personal risk and how to recognize potential litigious issues.

At the end of this course, the student will be able to:

Students will have the opportunity to become conversant with and knowledgeable about the major forces/ challenges that have shaped Health Law. Students will be provided with the necessary background on a wide range of current health care topics, enabling professionals to deal with common legal and practical problems facing the industry. This course will also examine case law and will offer students the opportunity to expand their legal knowledge through case law study method of learning to provide students an opportunity to better understand Health Law, review of the court system, application of the law and how to apply it in the real world.

This course is an introduction to health care business systems and models with a particular emphasis on the value of IT to the organization. This includes departmental design and management, capital and operating budgets, the budget planning process, and infrastructure design and strategic planning. Other topics include evaluation of vendors, vendor selection, purchase agreements and contracts, writing an RFP, analyzing an RFP response, clinical administration systems, and the design and management of integrated delivery networks.

At the end of this course students will be able to:

  • Assess how developments in information technology are changing the economics of the health care industry.
  • Evaluate proposals and agreements.
  • Evaluate the strategies and business models of health care information technology.
  1. SECURING IT ASSETS

    The goal of the Securing IT Assets track is to provide a knowledge base for managers and technology professionals concerned with the protection of an organization’s information assets. The track provides students with a practical understanding of the principles of data protection, network security, and computer forensics. The track also introduces students to the ethical, legal, and policy issues associated with information security. Courses from the Information Assurance program have been certified by the Committee on National System Security (CNSS)

    Common jobs titles for those within this program include: data security analyst, director of information technology, information security manager, IT auditor, security engineer or network security administrator.

The following courses are recommended for this area (select four):

Foundations of Information Security provides an understanding of the fundamental elements and technology “building blocks” of information assurance and computer security. The objective of the course is to provide coverage from the ground up on applied security concepts and technologies related to IT infrastructures, along with the attacks, threats and vulnerabilities currently faced by organizations. This course will expose students to fundamental security technologies and concepts in the areas of access control, cryptography, telecommunications and network security, application development security, and physical (environmental) security. This course provides the foundation for the remaining courses in the Information Assurance program.

At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Identify IT security requirements and categorize IT security attacks, threats and vulnerabilities.
    Explain the fundamentals of access control principles and models, and differentiate among common authentication methods, such as passwords, tokens and biometrics.
  • Analyze the fundamental elements and role of encryption processes in information assurance, and illustrate an example scenario where encryption processes are applied.
  • Identify the threats and vulnerabilities related to IT networks, and explain the concepts of managing and defending network attacks.
  • Identify the common software-related threats and vulnerabilities, and describe the best practices and methodologies for software assurance.
  • Describe the common physical access control threats and vulnerabilities, and explain how to control access to the physical resources of an organization.

Prerequisites: None

Foundations of Information Security Management will expose students to higher-level security concepts, infrastructures, standards, protocols and best practices that are necessary for today’s Information Security professional. Building on the knowledge of fundamental security technologies covered in Foundations of Information Security, students will develop an understanding of the fundamental tenets of information assurance solutions for businesses, government agencies and enterprises which require the establishment of a comprehensive security strategy and execution plan. This course will expose students to key concepts and principles in security operations; security architecture and design; information security governance and risk management; business continuity and disaster recovery planning; and topics in legal, regulations, investigations and compliance.

At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Evaluate security controls, operations and maintenance and explain how to create sustainable operational security.
  • Describe and evaluate security policies, procedures, baselines and guidelines.
  • Explain core security characteristics, such as Confidentiality, Integrity and Availability.
  • Develop strategies for assessing risks, performing risk analysis and trade-off analysis.
  • Explain the basics of business continuity management and strategies, along with the concept of disaster recovery planning.
  • Assess how laws, regulations and compliance play a role in the security of information, and illustrate at least one regulation that deals with protecting privacy or protecting commercial transactions.

Prerequisites: It is suggested that students complete RIAS 101 prior to taking RIAS 102.

This course covers both the principles and practice of digital forensics. It investigates the societal and legal impact of computer activity including computer crime, intellectual property, privacy issues, legal codes; risks, vulnerabilities, and countermeasures; forensic tools and techniques to uncover illegal or illicit activities left on disk and recovering files from intentionally damaged media; specific manifestations of cyber crime, including hacking, viruses, and other forms of malicious software; methods and standards for extraction, preservation, and deposition of legal evidence in a court of law. The course maps to the objectives of the International Association of Computer Investigative Specialists (IACIS) certification to provide credible, standards-based information.

At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Investigate digital forensics issues related to information technology.
  • Communicate the results of digital forensics investigation to colleagues.
  • Effectively address both current and future digital forensics challenges.

This course presents methods to identify vulnerabilities and take appropriate countermeasures to prevent, mitigate, and manage information failure risks for an organization. The course provides a foundation in disaster recovery principles, addressing concepts such as incident response; disaster recovery planning; risk assessment; policies and procedures; roles and relationships of various members of an organization; implementation of the plan; testing and rehearsal of the plan; and actually recovering from a disaster to insure business continuity.

At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Prepare an incident response plan that addresses preparation, organization, prevention, detection, notification, reaction, recovery, and maintenance.
  • Prepare a disaster recovery plan that addresses preparation, implementation, operation, and maintenance.
  • Assess enterprise-level risks related to disaster recovery.
  • Develop policies and procedures related to disaster recovery.
  • Prepare a business continuity plan addressing preparations, implementation, operations, and maintenance.

Awareness of the risks related to confidential information, intellectual property, and the consequences of disruptions to our IT infrastructure is going mainstream. But security leaders still must bridge an important language gap in their discussions of risk, by making a business connection between the “unrewarded” risks of security and compliance, and the “rewarded” risks of operations, innovation, and growth. This course will review practical methods for quantifying the uncertainties related to business decisions about information security, and for making risk-based decisions based on reducing those uncertainties by measurement and observation.

At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Develop risk assessments in the security context of protecting value, defending assets, and minimizing downside
  • Describe and connect such risk assessments in the business context of creating value, enabling assets, and maximizing upside
  • Frame decisions about information security risk in terms of uncertainties
  • Inform better decisions about information security based on using measurement and observation to reduce uncertainties

This course covers key bodies of knowledge and specializations in security, privacy, and compliance associated with enterprise information systems. The course explores the management of various technologies in emerging areas of information assurance including computer and network security, digital forensics, cryptography, and biometrics. Course concepts include cost/risk tradeoffs; technical, physical, and administrative methods of providing security and compliance; current privacy legislation; and technical means of providing privacy and IT compliance.

At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Describe threats to information security, and identify methods, tools and techniques for combating these threats.
  • Identify types of attacks and problems that occur when systems are not properly protected.
  • Explain integral parts of effective information security practices.
  • Identify and discuss issues related to access control.
  • Describe the need for, and development of, information security policies, and identify guidelines and models for writing policies.
  • Define risk management and assess its importance as a component of information security strategy and practice.
  • Describe types of contingency plans and the steps involved in developing them.
  • Identify security issues related to personnel decisions and the qualifications of security personnel.
  1. ENTERPRISE TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT

    With the expanded use of information technology in all facets of global organizations, skilled professionals who possess both information technology and management expertise are in high demand. The Enterprise Technology Management track prepares students to meet the information needs of users by utilizing leadership skills and demonstrating an understanding of management of information services and organizations. The skills offered in these courses will enable our students to plan strategy, marshal and deploy technology resources, optimally allocate those resources.

    Common jobs titles for those within this program include chief information officer, chief technology officer, information technology auditor, information technology manager/director, sourcing manager or technology manager. Potential workplaces include banking/finance, global technology firm, information technology company, insurance firm or software company.

The following courses are recommended for this area (select four):

This course examines the relationship between knowledge management and information technology and its extensions for the innovative and strategic management paradigms of the future. The central message of the course is that knowledge, not money or technology, will be the primary economic unit of business in the twenty-first century. Concepts covered include the analysis of knowledge management as an organizational strategy; the characteristics of knowledge management systems; the building of knowledge management systems; and the implementation of knowledge management systems.

At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Interpret and explain the importance of knowledge management to the enterprise.
  • Explain and illustrate the theory of knowledge management.
  • Formulate examples of the use knowledge management as an economic unit of business in the twenty-first century.
  • Identify, discuss and analyze how the management of knowledge is essential for an enterprise to achieve a position of competitive advantage in a global business environment.
  • Identify and describe how information technology is used to support the goals of knowledge management in the modern enterprise.
  • Describe the skills and procedures necessary to analyze, design and implement knowledge management systems.

This course focuses on the important legal, ethical, and societal issues associated with managing information technology resources, from multiple perspectives: technical, social, and philosophical. It examines the different ethical situations that arise in IT and provides practical techniques for addressing these issues. Concepts addressed include file sharing, infringement of intellectual property, security risks, Internet crime, identity theft, employee surveillance, privacy, and compliance.

At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Define ethics and convey the importance of acting according to a code of principles.
  • Analyze why business ethics have become increasingly important.
  • Assess practices that corporations have adopted to improve business ethics.
  • Develop approaches to ensure ethical decision making.
  • Analyze trends that have increased the risk of using information technology unethically.

Using advanced analytics, organizations can study “big data” to understand the current state of the business and track evolving aspects such as customer behavior. This course provides students the opportunity to develop an in-depth and real-world understanding of modern day data analytics. Students will be able to understand business goals and objectives as to why various types of organizations are utilizing and dependent upon data analytics. The course explores the importance of the various types of information systems and integration models in order to ensure accurate and reliable data in providing effective and efficient data analytics. Along with this, the course examines data model infrastructures and data preparation, along with data analysis, integration, and knowledge discovery.

Students will be able to understand the tools and techniques used to evaluate key components of data analytics including operations, quality, utilization, policy, and management. Students will not only be able to analyze and interpret various categories of data analytics, they also will explore the most effective ways to illustrate and present data to a number of different types of key stakeholders in various organizational settings.

At the end of this course the student will be able to:

  • Describe “big data.”
  • Analyze and interpret various categories of data analytics.
  • Assess data analytics tool types, including those based on predictive analytics, data mining, and statistics.
  • Explain the use of business intelligence (BI), including data warehousing and data analytics, to support managerial decision-making.
  • Analyze the structure and technological role data warehousing plays in business intelligence.
  • Evaluate methodologies for developing applications in an integrated BI environment.

Prerequisite: None

This course covers key bodies of knowledge and specializations in security, privacy, and compliance associated with enterprise information systems. The course explores the management of various technologies in emerging areas of information assurance including computer and network security, digital forensics, cryptography, and biometrics. Course concepts include cost/risk tradeoffs; technical, physical, and administrative methods of providing security and compliance; current privacy legislation; and technical means of providing privacy and IT compliance.

At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Describe threats to information security, and identify methods, tools and techniques for combating these threats.
  • Identify types of attacks and problems that occur when systems are not properly protected.
  • Explain integral parts of effective information security practices.
  • Identify and discuss issues related to access control.
  • Describe the need for, and development of, information security policies, and identify guidelines and models for writing policies.
  • Define risk management and assess its importance as a component of information security strategy and practice.
  • Describe types of contingency plans and the steps involved in developing them.
  • Identify security issues related to personnel decisions and the qualifications of security personnel.

Business continuity is the processes and procedures organizations use to help ensure that vital functions continue to effectively function during and following a disaster. Business continuity planning is an organizational activity designed to avert interruptions of vital organizational functions and to restore normal organizational functions as expeditiously and efficiently as possible.

At the end of the course, students will be prepared to:

  • Use Risk Management techniques to anticipate organizational risks and threats.
  • Use Business Impact Analysis techniques to identify probable consequences to organizations that experience a disaster.
  • Apply Project Management techniques to manage the development, testing, delivery and maintenance of a Business Continuity plan.
  • Develop an emergency response plan.
  • Develop a disaster recovery plan.
  • Use Crisis Communication methods to communicate with key stakeholders impacted by the organizational disaster.

This course explores the roles of individuals and teams within organizations and the skills and techniques required to manage successfully in the diversified organizations of the 21st century. Social networks and virtual teams are replacing committee meetings. Values and self-leadership are replacing command and control management. Diversity and globalization have become challenges as well as competitive opportunities for organizations. Co-workers aren’t down the hall; they’re at the other end of an Internet connection located somewhere else whether it is another city, state or country. Concepts covered include employee motivation and behavior, team cohesion and leadership; social networks as a source of power and organizational effectiveness; relevance of organizational behavior concepts and practices to organizations located in diverse national cultures.

The course centers on three complementary perspectives, or “lenses”, in an organization: the individual in the organization, and the foundations of individual behavior, including values, attitudes, job satisfaction, personality, emotions, and motivation; the groups and social processes, and the foundations of group behavior, including communication, group dynamics, team, management, decision making, power and conflicts; the organizational processes, and the concepts of organizational culture, principles of organizational structure, change management, learning and knowledge.

At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Define and understand organizational behavior as a complex process of adaptation to never-ending changes in society.
  • Assess the roles individuals and teams play in an organization and the necessity of their active participation in fulfilling its goals, as well as the role that managers play in controlling these processes.
  • Assess and explain factors that influence behavior and performance.
  • Identify and understand the main models of leader and group roles and development, motivation, and decision-making.
  • Characterize different types of organizational structures and the implications of different designs; describe the unique challenges presented by multi-national, international, and e-organizations.
  • Define the common characteristics of organizational culture and explain how virtualization and internationalization influence it.
  • Discuss the importance of managing organizational change and globalization.
  1. SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT/ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT

    The focus of this track is to provide students with the background needed for managing a team of highly skilled software development professionals and to be responsible for the achievement of specific engineering goals and objectives. Those in these positions need technical expertise and leadership skills, including the ability to effectively motivate, develop and manage a team of technical professionals as well as the ability to influence others within the organization.

    Common jobs titles for those within this program include: software development leader, software team leader, software development manager, information technology manager/director.

The following courses are recommended for those who already have some software development and programming background (select four):

This course covers non-programming related aspects and best practices of the software development process, from requirements engineering, architectural design, and quality management to software maintenance and process improvement. Concepts addressed include software engineering tools, models, and methodologies; requirements engineering and specifications; system modeling; business process analysis; VORD and Use Case analysis; control and distribution models; estimating and scheduling; risk management; software maintenance and improvement; and ethics within the industry.

At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Select and rationalize the appropriate development methodology.
  • Select appropriate software process models.
  • Use the principles of software project management as they relate to planning, scheduling and determining risk.
  • Write a clear, concise requirement specification.
  • Create and analyze system models including context, behavioral, data, object, and structured models.
  • Apply knowledge of system development to the selection of rapid development techniques including agile methods, extreme programming RAD and prototyping.
  • Apply knowledge of system development to the selection of code reuse and component-based development.
  • Apply knowledge of various manual and automated techniques to verify and validate both the software and the process.

This course covers a broad range of topics related to software quality assurance (SQA). The course explores the combined application of a variety of SQA components, including: SQA activities typically performed by external participants; extension of SQA activities to project schedules and budget control; SQA implementation issues, SQA risk management considerations; and costs associated with SQA.

At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Foster the development, adoption and sustained use of standards of excellence for software engineering practices, communicating the need for comprehensive SQA requirements to senior management.
  • Define and employ SQA processes and techniques to ensure that reliable software is delivered to end users.
  • Supporting outcomes:
    • Examine the environments for which SQA methods are developed.
    • Determine SQA objectives.
    • Illustrate the need for comprehensive SQA requirements.
    • Outline the considerations guiding construction of an organization’s SQA system.
    • Determine software quality factors.
    • Explain SQA standards and assessment components.
    • Illustrate the contract review process and its stages.
    • Develop quality plans and quality plan objectives.
    • Describe verification, validation, and qualification.
    • Determine design review procedures.
    • Analyze software testing strategies.
    • Illustrate software testing implementation processes.
    • Examine SQA tools for assuring the quality of external participant’s contributions.
    • Define corrective and preventative actions.

This course provides an introduction to theory, tools and techniques needed by software release engineers. It is intended to give students the skills to evaluate and establish tools to support structured development methodologies.

At the end of the course, the student will be able to:

  • Explain the importance of configuration management and release engineering on software projects.
  • Explain the four elements of configuration control: configuration identification, configuration control, configuration status accounting, and configuration audit.
  • Make informed decisions about selection of tools for source-code management and issue tracking.
  • Describe the technical underpinnings of build tools such as make and ant.
  • Use a modern build tool as part of a configuration management system.
  • Establish a source-code control and defect-tracking system.

This course covers topics related to software testing methodology, with a focus on realistic, pragmatic steps for testing consumer and business software. Concepts covered include test cycles; testing objectives; testing in the software development process; types of software errors; reporting and analyzing software errors; problem tracking systems; test case design; testing tools; test planning; test documentation; and managing a test group.

At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Plan and apply the appropriate level of testing within the context of a software development application to the satisfaction of its beneficiaries.
  • Design specific and measurable test cases to ensure coverage and traceability to requirements.
  • Use problem reporting techniques, metrics, and testing status reports to communicate testing results to colleagues, managers, and end users.
  • Determine realistic estimates of resources for testing projects.

The Service-Oriented Architecture course focuses on GPS students who are architects, designers, business analysts, IT managers. The course examines architecture and design, what the important principles of SOA are, and how they should be applied. It delves into each of the important aspects of architecture, including business, information, application, and technology, as they relate to service-oriented solutions.

At the end of this course the student will be able to:

  • Architects will learn the relationships between architectural concerns, enterprise context, and the SOA design process. This is particularly important in making architecture actionable.
  • Designers will learn a step-by-step process for the analysis and design of services, and what the different types and styles of services are. They will come to understand what information is required from the business for complete service design, how that relates to process and information models, and how it shows up in the different design artifacts. But most importantly, they will learn how to start thinking in terms of SOA; in other words, how to shift their design paradigm.
  • Business analysts will learn the relationship between business strategies, goals, and objectives, and the capabilities and information that are used to achieve them. Analysts will learn how to use business process models as the link between business architecture and IT design, specifically SOA.
  • IT Managers will get an understanding of the SOA architecture and design process that will enable them to understand, govern, plan, and manage SOA projects that deliver value to both their immediate project and to the enterprise.

The Service-Oriented Architecture Course is structured in three parts: Understanding SOA, Designing SOA and Case Studies.

Part I: Understanding SOA provides the motivation for SOA and the architectural requirements needed to meet them, then describes SOA architecture structure and principles, and finally describes the process for getting started with SOA in the enterprise.

Part II: Designing SOA explores the details of each step in the design process. It is roughly divided into two main areas:

  1. Topics Starting with the Business, Service Context and Common Semantics, Designing Service Interfaces, Designing Service Implementations cover the design of services
  2. Topics Composing Services, Using Services to Build Enterprise Solutions, Designing and Using Integration in SOA Solutions, SOA Security, SOA Governance focus on building enterprise SOA solutions.

Part III: Case Studies illustrate architecture and design principles and strategies by exploring two different case studies in depth. The first focuses on designing business services to support business processes. The second focuses on integrating existing applications into a service-oriented solution.

This course covers data modeling, including relational, object-oriented, and object-relational database design concepts and issues. Concepts addressed include relational theory and database design; entity relationship modeling; normalization; issues of design and implementation; issues of database integrity, security, recovery and concurrence; and object-oriented databases.

At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Identify and clearly document business requirements and proposed solutions.
  • Define database requirements and design an entity-relationship diagram.
  • Create a conceptual model from an entity-relationship diagram.
  • Translate a conceptual model into a physical design.
  • Apply knowledge of DDL to create a set of tables from a physical design.
  • Develop a set of class diagrams for an object-oriented database design.
  • Code ODL scripts to create a set of tables based upon class diagrams.

For those with minimal programming experience, the following courses are suggested:

  • RSEG 120 Software Development Methodologies
  • RSEG 102 Advanced Programming in Java OR RSEG 103 Advanced Programming in C++ OR RSEG 180 Advanced Programming in C#
  • RSEG 109 Object Oriented Design OR RSEG 126 Release Engineering and Configuration Management
  • RSEG 167 Service Oriented Architecture

This course covers non-programming related aspects and best practices of the software development process, from requirements engineering, architectural design, and quality management to software maintenance and process improvement. Concepts addressed include software engineering tools, models, and methodologies; requirements engineering and specifications; system modeling; business process analysis; VORD and Use Case analysis; control and distribution models; estimating and scheduling; risk management; software maintenance and improvement; and ethics within the industry.

At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Select and rationalize the appropriate development methodology.
  • Select appropriate software process models.
  • Use the principles of software project management as they relate to planning, scheduling and determining risk.
  • Write a clear, concise requirement specification.
  • Create and analyze system models including context, behavioral, data, object, and structured models.
  • Apply knowledge of system development to the selection of rapid development techniques including agile methods, extreme programming RAD and prototyping.
  • Apply knowledge of system development to the selection of code reuse and component-based development.
  • Apply knowledge of various manual and automated techniques to verify and validate both the software and the process.
  • RSEG 102 Advanced Programming in Java OR RSEG 103 Advanced Programming in C++ OR RSEG 180 Advanced Programming in C#

This course explores advanced topics of Java programming language, including object- oriented programming concepts; exceptions; generic programming and annotations; collections; Java foundations classes (JFC); delegation event model; layout managers; swing components including panels, menus, toolbars, and text components; multi-threading; streams and input/output programming; networking; and Java database connectivity (JDBC).

At the end of this course the student will be able to:

  • Design and develop programs in Java using inheritance, composition, interfaces, polymorphism, and exceptions.
  • Design and develop programs in Java using Java Collection Framework.
  • Design and develop graphical user interfaces (GUI) using Java Foundation Classes.
  • Design and develop multithreaded Java programs.
  • Design and develop networking Java programs.
  • Design and develop Java programs using Java Database Connectivity (JDBC).
  • Design Java Classes.

This course provides a solid foundation of C++ with focus on object-oriented concepts and programming techniques. Concepts covered include classes, objects, abstract data types, file processing, inheritance, encapsulation, polymorphism, overloading, reuse, and templates.

At the end of this course the student will be able to:

  • Design and develop programs in C++, employing a variety of language constructs.
  • Apply knowledge of C++ programming concepts to program development, including classes, inheritance, polymorphism, and templates.
  • Apply object-oriented concepts to the design and development of C++ programs.

This course covers the programming language C# (pronounced “C sharp”), used to develop Windows applications. The focus of the course is learning the .NET programming environment, Windows programming and the syntax and capabilities of the C# language. Concepts covered will include Microsoft Visual Studio .NET IDE, C# language syntax, control structures, arrays, exception handling, Windows graphical user interface, multithreading, strings, graphics and multimedia, files and streams, XML, database SQL and ADO .NET, ASP .Net, web forms and web controls, ASP .NET and web services, networking, data structures and collections.

This is a programming course that addresses how to develop Windows applications using the C# (pronounced “C sharp”) programming language. Students will learn the Microsoft .NET environment for developing and running software applications, featuring ease of development of web-based services, rich standard run-time services available to components written in a variety of programming languages, and inter-language and inter-machine interoperability.

The focus of the course is learning the .NET programming environment, Windows programming and the syntax and capabilities of the C# language.

At the end of this course the student will be able to:

  • Install and learn the Microsoft Visual C# IDE,
  • Create a C# console application
  • Understand C# classes, objects and control statements
  • Describe the basics of C# graphics programming
  • Master Creating a Windows Forms Program
  • Create and manipulate SQL Databases in the C# language
  • Apply the basic concepts of Web programming using the C# language
  • Apply the basic concepts of ASP .NET & ASP.NET AJAX programming using the C# language
  • Apply C# GUI with Windows Presentation Foundation, C# WPF Graphics and Multimedia, and C# XML and LINQ Programming 
  • RSEG 109 Object Oriented Design OR RSEG 126 Release Engineering and Configuration Management

Object-oriented modeling and design form the foundation of many software projects today and are pre-requisites to developing in C++, Java, and other object-oriented programming languages. This course covers object modeling and design techniques as they are applied from the point the high-level project requirements are established, through high level and detailed design, to the point where implementation is ready to start. The course focuses on Unified Modeling Language (UML), an approach that combines previously competing object modeling theories, as well as concepts including distributed object frameworks; design patterns; existing object-oriented languages such as C++ and Java; and lifecycle and maintenance issues of object-oriented applications.

At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Apply object modeling and design techniques from the point the high-level project requirements are established, through high level and detailed design, to the point where implementation is ready to start.
  • Design software systems using object-oriented concepts including Unified Modeling Language (UML) design approach: classes, class diagrams, interfaces, types, and roles.
  • Create static object models for a system, including class diagrams, association diagrams, and inheritance diagrams.
  • Create dynamic, behavioral object models for a system, including use cases and interaction diagrams.
  • Apply advanced Object Oriented design techniques, such as architectural modeling, component frameworks, and design patterns.

This course provides an introduction to theory, tools and techniques needed by software release engineers. It is intended to give students the skills to evaluate and establish tools to support structured development methodologies.

At the end of the course, the student will be able to:

  • Explain the importance of configuration management and release engineering on software projects.
  • Explain the four elements of configuration control: configuration identification, configuration control, configuration status accounting, and configuration audit.
  • Make informed decisions about selection of tools for source-code management and issue tracking.
  • Describe the technical underpinnings of build tools such as make and ant.
  • Use a modern build tool as part of a configuration management system.
  • Establish a source-code control and defect-tracking system.

The Service-Oriented Architecture course focuses on GPS students who are architects, designers, business analysts, IT managers. The course examines architecture and design, what the important principles of SOA are, and how they should be applied. It delves into each of the important aspects of architecture, including business, information, application, and technology, as they relate to service-oriented solutions.

At the end of this course the student will be able to:

  • Architects will learn the relationships between architectural concerns, enterprise context, and the SOA design process. This is particularly important in making architecture actionable.
  • Designers will learn a step-by-step process for the analysis and design of services, and what the different types and styles of services are. They will come to understand what information is required from the business for complete service design, how that relates to process and information models, and how it shows up in the different design artifacts. But most importantly, they will learn how to start thinking in terms of SOA; in other words, how to shift their design paradigm.
  • Business analysts will learn the relationship between business strategies, goals, and objectives, and the capabilities and information that are used to achieve them. Analysts will learn how to use business process models as the link between business architecture and IT design, specifically SOA.
  • IT Managers will get an understanding of the SOA architecture and design process that will enable them to understand, govern, plan, and manage SOA projects that deliver value to both their immediate project and to the enterprise.

The Service-Oriented Architecture Course is structured in three parts: Understanding SOA, Designing SOA and Case Studies.

Part I: Understanding SOA provides the motivation for SOA and the architectural requirements needed to meet them, then describes SOA architecture structure and principles, and finally describes the process for getting started with SOA in the enterprise.

Part II: Designing SOA explores the details of each step in the design process. It is roughly divided into two main areas:

  1. Topics Starting with the Business, Service Context and Common Semantics, Designing Service Interfaces, Designing Service Implementations cover the design of services
  2. Topics Composing Services, Using Services to Build Enterprise Solutions, Designing and Using Integration in SOA Solutions, SOA Security, SOA Governance focus on building enterprise SOA solutions.

Part III: Case Studies illustrate architecture and design principles and strategies by exploring two different case studies in depth. The first focuses on designing business services to support business processes. The second focuses on integrating existing applications into a service-oriented solution.

There are many options to fund your education. Please note that tuition is subject to change annually. With 30 credits required to graduate, the program tuition is currently anticipated to be $30,700.

Tuition and Fees  

Graduate course (three credits)

$3,070

Late Registration Fee

$70

Application fee (master’s or graduate certificate programs)  

$50
Application to graduate fee $100

Featured Faculty

Industry experts teach tomorrow’s technology leaders

Jim La Creta, MS

Jim La Creta
MS

Jim La Creta is the Director of Technology at Brandeis University’s International Business School. His more than fifteen years of experience working in technology and communications include significant management expertise. As an accomplished director of IT systems and projects, he develops and manages business critical information systems.

Philip Holberton

Philip Holberton
BA, CPA

Philip Holberton is the founder of Holberton Group Inc – Speaking of Leadership, a business advisory firm specializing in strategic, organizational and executive coaching. He has more than twenty years of executive experience in companies such as General Cinema Theatres, Cambridge NeuroScience, Becton Dickinson and a number of other start-up companies. He is the retired President and CEO of Differential Proteomics Inc., a private biotechnology company.

Cynthia Phillips

Cynthia Phillips
PhD

Cynthia Phillips is the Academic Program Chair for the Information Technology Management, Information Security, and Health and Medical Informatics programs. Her background includes software development, requirements engineering, and information systems management, and her educational work has seen her leading a variety of industry seminars.

How We Teach

A student-centered approach

Graduate Professional Studies has been applying online course development and delivery best practices for more than a decade.  

Learning online with GPS means that you will:

  • Engage in Small Classes with professionals in your field, discussing and applying practical techniques you can bring back to your job. 
  • Collaborate with Experienced Instructors who also work in your fields, bringing their experiences directly into the online classroom
  • Participate when Convenient for you. You will not be required to participate or “attend class” on a particular day or time.  There is a weekly pace, and discussion posts and other assignments are due through the course week. 
  • Learn Online with Confidence. Before your first online course begins, you will complete an orientation course through which you will become comfortable with our approach, our standard course structure, and the learning management system (Moodle).
  • Experience Brandeis Standards of Excellence.  Your courses and program go through layers of reviews as part of our quality infrastructure, including course & instructor reviews, internal reviews by faculty, and external reviews by Professional Advisory Boards.
  • Receive Personal Support  from your assigned Student Advisor who will help you navigate your graduate experience, serving as your main point of contact from admission through graduation.

Our Graduates

Their success stories

Scott Paddock

As an online learner at Brandeis GPS, I found the coursework and support resources convenient and accommodating. In fact, I rarely felt as though my studies were an interruption. What I learned was immediately applicable, and I continue every day to benefit from the understanding the courses gave me. I was offered a new job during coursework, and I later discovered that one of the primary reasons I received the offer was because I was enrolled in the program. I’ve found that, when making new connections, having a degree from Brandeis earns you a great amount of initial trust.

Scott Paddock

Michelle Welsh

The curriculum was challenging and real-world related. The principles of project management I learned can really be applied to almost any field and aspect of life, but my new knowledge gave me the confidence to start my own business and apply Project Management tools and techniques to non-traditional fields. I loved the flexibility of the classes. I was able to complete my degree from across the country while working and starting a family, and the distance learning requirements created a highly structured and engaging format, requiring students to be involved in the subject matter almost daily.

Michelle Welsh

Lydia Vanessa Cotto Cora

When I started to look for graduate programs, I had been out of school for 11 years. I have a very demanding job, so I needed a program that fit into my already busy lifestyle. The curriculum was complete! They covered everything I could ask for as an aspiring Project/Program Manager, and I was able to use materials taken directly from the courses at my current position. During my time in the program, I was impressed with the level of dedication of the staff and instructors. I have never experience the level of commitment instructors showed helping me learn and improve from my mistakes. My experience at Brandeis GPS laid out a professional path I didn’t even know was there.

Lydia Vanessa Cotto Cora

Apply Online Today

How to Apply

Admission Requirements

To be eligible to apply for admission, students must hold a bachelor’s degree from an accredited U.S. institution or its equivalent.

Students may take up to two courses prior to applying to a degree program. Individuals interested in applying for admission to a master’s degree program are required to apply by the end of their second graduate level course in order for all applicable courses to count towards their degree.

Applications for admission will not be reviewed until all required documents have been received at the GPS office. Admissions decisions are usually made within four to six weeks of receipt of a completed application.

To be eligible for admission, the following documents must be submitted:

  1. Completed online master’s degree application

    New applicants should use the “Create an Account” option to begin your application process. If you can’t complete your application in one sitting, use the “Save and Complete Later” function. When you have more time, log in (returning users) to finish your application. You will receive a confirmation number when the application is submitted.

    If you have applied for admissions to a master’s degree program, you may login to view the progress of your application file.  You may also contact your Enrollment Advisor or the GPS admissions office.

    Slate Application Center Change

  2. Nonrefundable application fee of $50

    The application fee may be paid online during the online application process via the university’s secured server. The university accepts Visa, MasterCard, Discover and American Express credit cards. You may also mail a check to the GPS office.

  3. A four-year bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution or equivalent.

  4. Official transcript(s) from every college or university attended.

    Transcript(s) must be submitted in sealed, signed envelopes and mailed directly from your institution to:

    Online Education Center On Behalf of Brandeis University
    3333 South Congress Avenue
    Suite 100
    Delray Beach, FL 33445

  5. Resumé or curriculum vitae

  6. Statement of Goals

  7. Letter of recommendation

  8. TOEFL, IELTS or PTE (for non-native English speakers)
    Applicants whose first language is not English or who have not graduated with a bachelor’s degree from an English-speaking institution in Australia, Belize, the British Caribbean and British West Indies, Canada (except Quebec), Great Britain, Guyana, Ireland, Liberia, New Zealand, or South Africa must take and submit scores for the TOEFL or IELTS, with guidelines and exceptions noted below. Test scores should be no more than five years old.

    Strong communication skills including the abilities to read and write effectively in English are essential for student success in our programs, particularly our distance learning programs. The purpose of these requirements is to ensure that students are equipped to participate in and perform the work required by their courses.

    TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language): Applicants must achieve a minimum score of 100 on the Internet-based (iBT) TOEFL, with a minimum of 24 on each of the four sub-scores; (or 600 on the paper-based (PBT) TOEFL with a minimum of 58 on the reading and writing sub-scores, and a 4.5 or higher on the essay writing score (TWE).

    IELTS (International English language Testing System): Applicants must achieve a minimum score of 7.0 on the individual band scores for academic reading and academic writing.

    PTE Academic (Pearson Test of English Academic): Applicants must achieve a minimum score of 68 on the PTE Academic English Language Proficiency test. 

    All submitted score records must include the segmented point distribution among the parts of the test, along with the total. Scores should be sent directly to the Division of Graduate Professional Studies, using the institutional code 0253.

    Exceptions are made for applicants whose bachelor’s degree was earned in many “American Universities”, such as American University in Cairo or AU in Paris, among others.,

  9. Education Credential Evaluation (if bachelor’s degree was earned outside the United States)

    Applicants who earned their bachelor’s degree outside the United States must submit their records for a course-by-course evaluation (official transcripts/mark sheets) by Education Credential Evaluators (ECE) of Madison, Wisc. Information regarding the evaluation process is detailed at the ECE Web site. Applicants are responsible for the evaluation fee.

Upcoming Registration and Application Deadlines

  • July 15
Recommended Application Deadline for Fall 2014 
  • Aug 12 – Sept 7
Fall Registration Period Begins (Fall 2014)
  • Sept 8– Sept 12 
Late Registration (Last week for Fall 2014 Registration)
  • Sept 17
First week of Online Classes (Fall 2014)

Tuition & Payment Options

2013-2014 Academic Year Tuition and Fees (Fall 2013 – Summer 2014)

Tuition and Fees  

Graduate course (three credits)

$3,070

Late Registration Fee

$70

Application fee (master’s or graduate certificate programs)

$50
Application to graduate fee $100

Payment Options

Acceptable forms of payment include:

  • Personal check
  • Visa, MasterCard, Discover and American Express credit cards
  • Electronic bank draft

Students must be prepared to pay tuition in full. Student registration will not be considered complete unless full payment of tuition and fees is received.

Course Withdrawal and Refund Policy

Students who wish to cancel their registration and receive a tuition refund must state their intention to withdraw by withdrawing from their course online using SAGE or by completing a course Drop Form and submitting it to the Division of Graduate Professional Studies. Tuition will be refunded according to the following schedule:

  • Withdrawal before the first Wednesday of the term, 100 percent refund
  • Withdrawal between the first Wednesday and following Tuesday of the term, 75 percent refund
  • Withdrawal on or after the second Wednesday of the term, no refund
  • Late Registration Fees are nonrefundable in all cases

Students who wish to receive a refund must submit a request using the Credit Release form. Otherwise, the amount will remain on the student’s account and be applied toward a future tuition payment. Refunds will be in the form of a check and processed within 10 business days. When applicable refund policies of the state where distance learning students reside will be used to calculate any applicable refunds. Click here for state policies.

Tax Deductions

Some students may be eligible for an income-tax deduction or a tax credit. Consult the appropriate state or federal agency or your own tax adviser for further information.

Financial Aid

Federal Loans:

GPS students may be eligible for federal loans as long as they are enrolled in a master’s program, registered for at least two courses each term and actively working toward completing their degree requirements. We do not offer financial assistance in the form of Federal Work-Study, teaching assistantships or other grants. A variety of federal loan programs, including the Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan and the Federal Direct Graduate PLUS Loan, may be available to GPS students who meet the above enrollment criteria. The Unsubsidized Stafford loan is not need or credit based, however, the Graduate PLUS loan is credit based.

All students who wish to apply for financial aid must complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) online at www.fafsa.ed.gov, and notify GPS in writing of the date on which the FAFSA form is submitted. When completing the FAFSA form, students should list Brandeis University (federal code 002133) as a recipient of the data.

Students requesting financial aid also must complete a Federal Direct Stafford Loan Application for Graduate Professional Studies. This form must be submitted to the Office of Student Financial Services before the start of the term so that loan funds may be applied.

2013-2014 Federal Direct Stafford Loan Application for Graduate Professional Studies (PDF)

If a student would like to apply for a Graduate PLUS loan in addition to the Stafford loan, you can follow the instructions on the Office of Student Financial Services webpage: http://www.brandeis.edu/sfs/loans/GradPLUSAppIns.html

Private Loans:

Students who are enrolled in only one class a semester, or who take classes as a non-degree student, may still be eligible for private loans. Private loans are always credit based. To see which loan programs you could be eligible for, we recommend using the website https://borrowsmart.afford.com/brs/ to compare loan options.  We strongly suggest that students also do their own research on private loans as well.

Contact Information:

For more information about loan options and eligibility, please contact Francine Davis in the Office of Student Financial Services at (781)736-3713. We also highly suggest reviewing the Graduate and Professional Studies Financial Aid Instruction Sheet  form for detailed loan application instructions.

Additional Satisfactory Academic Progress Requirement for Students Receiving Financial Aid

Federal regulations require that a student receiving federal assistance make satisfactory academic progress in accordance with standards set by the university. The Division of Graduate Professional Studies is responsible for monitoring academic progress within its graduate programs. To receive federal funding, a student must successfully complete two courses (B- or higher) in each semester in which he or she receives federal loans. If he or she fails to successfully complete two courses in a semester in which he or she receives federal loans, he or she will be allowed to receive federal loans for the next semester but will be placed on probation. If he or she fails to successfully complete two courses during the probationary semester, he or she will lose eligibility for federal loans from this point forward. A student may submit an appeal if there are extenuating circumstances that prevented him or her from successfully completing coursework for two subsequent semesters.

Employer Reimbursement

Many employers offer some form of tuition reimbursement to their employees. Contact your company to determine tuition benefits. Please be advised that tuition reimbursement constitutes a private arrangement between employer and employee. Full payment of tuition and fees must be received upon registration, regardless of the terms of such an arrangement between the employee and employer. If you need a financial statement for reimbursement purposes, you may submit a request online using the Request Itemized Statement form.

Once you have submitted an application for admission, your application will be processed within 24 to 48 hours of receipt. However, your application file will not be reviewed for admission until the Graduate Professional Studies (GPS) office has received all required documents.

If you have applied for admissions to a master’s degree program, you may login to GPS Application Management Center to view the progress of your application. You may also contact your Enrollment Advisor or the GPS admissions office.

The admissions committee typically makes admissions decisions within four to six weeks of receiving a completed file. Decision letters are mailed to all applicants.

Application Note

How many letters of recommendation are required?

Only one letter of recommendation from an employer/supervisor or instructor is required. You may submit additional letters of recommendation if you wish.

Are the GREs or GMATs required for admission?

No.

When can I apply for admission?

GPS offers rolling admission; however, there are recommended deadlines if you are seeking admission for a specific semester. Those deadlines are June 15 for fall admission, Oct. 15 for spring admission and Feb. 15 for summer admission. Students wishing to pursue a master’s degree must apply by the end of their second course.

Do I have to enroll in a GPS course prior to applying to a program?

No, you may apply for admission without enrolling in a GPS course. Please refer to the Apply for a Master’s Degree page for eligibility requirements.

I completed my undergraduate degree outside the United States. Must I have my marksheets/transcripts evaluated?

Yes, all students who studied outside of the United States must complete a course-by-course evaluation through Educational Credential Evaluators. If you completed a graduate degree at a U.S.-accredited institution, you will not be required to complete a course-by-course evaluation of your undergraduate degree.

I have my own copy of my transcripts. Is this acceptable to submit for admission?

No, only official copies of transcripts sent directly from your college/university in sealed, signed envelopes to the Graduate Professional Studies offices are acceptable. If you studied outside of the United States, notarized copies of your official transcript may be accepted.

Are the programs offered by GPS full-time or part-time?

GPS programs are only offered part time, with courses available in the evenings (on campus) or online.

How long does it take to receive an admissions decision?

Admissions decisions are typically reached by the Admissions Committee within four to six weeks of receiving a completed application.

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Register to attend the Virtual Open House to learn more about the online M.S. in Information Technology Management degree program. Space is limited.

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Brandeis GPS is committed to giving our student the help they need to navigate their degree programs. From the moment you begin the application process to the day you receive your degree, our advising staff is there to support you. Schedule a call with an enrollment advisor today.

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